Peace Islands Institute

Wednesday
Sep 26th
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Join us on this sweet event. Let's Share...

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As a proactive community we distribute Noah's Pudding every year. The making of Noah’s Pudding is a common practice among Muslims and Christians in the Middle East. It is the symbol of sharing joy – the joy of Noah’s landing, the joy of Moses’ crossing the Red Sea, and God’s bestowments upon many other Prophets.




People cook Noah’s Pudding every year in Turkey. Christian communities throughout the Middle East prepare a similar sweet dish, called hedik, amah, or qamhiyyi. People who cook Noah’s Pudding at home send a bowl of it to each of their neighbors. Because, one has the responsibility to maintain good relations with their neighbors regardless of what their religion or beliefs may be. Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) said: “The Archangel Gabriel counseled me so frequently regarding the rights of neighbors that I was afraid the neighbor would be declared an heir as well”.

We cordially invite you to be part of this sweet event by letting us serve Noah’s Pudding in your church, synagogue or class any time in January 2010.

As this event, it is purposely intended to increase solidarity in our neighborhood, it will be pleasure for us to serve Noah’s Pudding to you.

This event was organized by IDC and will be organized by the Turkish Cultural Center New Jersey (TCCNJ) from this year on.

If you want to be part of this celebration email TCCNJ at info(at)tccnj.org, stating when and what time you would like them to visit your church/synagogue/class and how many cups of pudding they should bring.

TCCNJ volunteers will serve the pudding and they may even give a short speech about Noah’s pudding.

Noah’s Pudding and Its Religious Sources for Muslims
A day of fasting among the Muslims observed on the tenth day of the first month of the Islamic calendar, Muharram, and derived from the Jewish Day of Atonement.*


When the Prophet Muhammad arrived in Madinah in 622 CE, he found that the Jews of this city fasted on Muharram 10th, and asked them the reason for this. They said, “This is a blessed day. On this day God saved the Children of Israel from their enemy (in Egypt). Therefore the Prophet Moses fasted on this day in gratitude to God.” Then he also fasted and encouraged the Muslims to fast on that day and the day before in gratitude to God, just as Moses had done.
* Muharram 10 is December 26 in 2009 and December 16 in 2010.

The Story of Noah’s Pudding (Ashura)
It was thousands of years ago that a community was again on the threshold of a catastrophe. This community had abandoned worshipping one God and started to commit all kinds of sins including adultery.

The Prophet Noah called this community to the true way of believing in one God for 950 years, but they teased him and called him crazy. Later, even his wife joined the unbelievers in their betrayal. Noah suffered with his people for 800 years, but he remained sincere in his faith in the Lord. Then, one day, God sent the Angel Gabriel to Noah to warn about a coming flood and to order him to build a ship. Noah built the ship and God ordered him to take a couple from each of the creatures, all of the believers, and his family with the exception of his wife. Once again, Noah warned his people and told them about the flood, but they kept denying him.

Finally, the supplies were loaded and the believers and animals boarded the ship. Then God ordered to the sky, "O sky! Let your water pour down." and He ordered to the earth, "O earth, hold your water." The water began to rise. As all of the nonbelievers were drowning along with their vices, a long and tumultuous journey started for Noah and the believers.



Days passed. Food became scarce. They were facing starvation. None of the remaining food ingredients was sufficient to make a decent meal, so Noah gathered all of them and mixed producing a delicious meal.

As a result, the believers survived the famine, and the very next day, the flood receded. Today we call the meal that Noah prepared "Noah's Pudding" or "Ashura."

Every year people cook Noah’s Pudding in remembrance of Noah and God's mercy on him and on the believers.

Historical Significance
Ashura is a day of great historical significance. Because God granted His special offerings to 10 prophets on this day:
• God created heavens and worlds.
• God accepted the repentance of Adam after his exile from Paradise.
• God saved Noah and his companions.
• God spoke directly to Moses and gave him the Commandments.
• Jonah was saved from the stomach of the fish.
• The sea split apart to let the children of Israel pass and joined back to destroy Pharaoh’s army.
• Jesus was born and raised to the heavens.
• Job was restored to health.
• Fire did not burn Abraham.
• Solomon was granted his kingdom.
• Joseph was rescued from the well.
• Jacob and Joseph rejoined.
• God raised Enoch to the heavens.

The Tradition Still Continues!
The making of ashura is a common practice among Muslims and Christians in the Middle East.

In Turkey, people cook ashura at a certain time of the year. Christian communities throughout the Middle East prepare a similar sweet dish, called hedik, amah, or qamhiyyi.

People who cook ashura at home send a cup of it to each of their neighbors. Because, one has the responsibility to maintain good relations with their neighbors regardless of what their religion or beliefs may be.
(Peace be upon the Prophets mentioned in this text)

The Recipe
Thousands of years old recipe for Noah’s Pudding - makes 30 servings for you and your neighbors.

Ingredients*:
1 cup wheat
1 cup white beans
1 cup chickpeas
1 cup raisins
1 cup almonds
3/4 cup peanuts
12 dried apricots
5 1/2 cups sugar
Water (enough to cover)
Topping: walnuts, cinnamon



Preparation:
1. Soak wheat, white beans, chickpeas, and almonds in water overnight.
2. Boil the above ingredients (step 1) and remove their outer shells or skin.
3. Soak the raisins in boiling water until they soften.
4. Put the above ingredients (steps 1-3) in a large pot and boil. Add peanuts and almonds (peeled and cut in half) at this point.
5. Chop the apricot into small pieces and add to the mixture along with sugar.
6. Boil for 10-15 minutes.
7. Enjoy your pudding!

* These are the ingredients we chose. Feel free to experiment with other grains, fruits, and nuts.

Some pictures from previous years: